Skip to content
FREE SHIPPING ORDERS OVER $75. SHOP NOW

Customer Service Email

ALL ORDERS SHIP WITH TRACKING

Top Fishing Patterns

The Best Fishing Flies to Use for Largemouth Bass

28 May 2024

Largemouth bass are one of the most popular game fish in North America, known for their aggressive strikes and powerful fights. Fly fishing for largemouth bass can be incredibly rewarding, especially when you use the right flies. In this comprehensive guide, we'll explore the best fishing flies for targeting largemouth bass. We'll delve into the history of each fly, discuss which fish they attract, provide tips on how to fish them, and suggest the best equipment to use.

1. Clouser Minnow

History: The Clouser Minnow was created by Bob Clouser in the 1980s. Originally designed for smallmouth bass, it quickly became a favorite for largemouth bass and other predatory fish. Its realistic baitfish profile and versatility have made it a staple in fly boxes worldwide.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are drawn to the Clouser Minnow because it imitates the appearance and movement of small baitfish. This fly's weighted eyes allow it to sink quickly and create a jigging motion that entices aggressive strikes.

How to Fish It: The Clouser Minnow can be fished using various techniques. One effective method is to strip it in with short, sharp pulls to mimic a fleeing baitfish. You can also let it sink and then retrieve it with a series of quick jerks to create an erratic swimming action.

Equipment: A 9-foot 7-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is ideal for fishing the Clouser Minnow. Use a 9-foot tapered leader with a 0X or 1X tippet for the best presentation.

2. Woolly Bugger

History: The Woolly Bugger is one of the most versatile and effective flies ever created. Its origins can be traced back to the 1960s when it was developed by Russell Blessing in Pennsylvania. This fly was designed to imitate a variety of prey, including leeches, baitfish, and nymphs.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are highly responsive to the Woolly Bugger due to its lifelike undulating motion in the water. This fly can imitate anything from a fleeing baitfish to a swimming leech, making it a go-to pattern for bass anglers.

How to Fish It: The Woolly Bugger can be fished using various techniques. You can strip it in with short, jerky motions to mimic a fleeing baitfish or let it drift naturally in the current. Slow, steady retrieves often work best when targeting largemouth bass.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is ideal for fishing the Woolly Bugger. Use a 9-foot tapered leader with a 1X or 2X tippet for the best presentation.

3. Popper

History: Poppers have been a favorite among bass anglers for decades. These topwater flies were originally designed in the early 20th century to mimic the appearance and movement of frogs and other surface-dwelling prey.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are known for their explosive topwater strikes, and poppers are designed to take advantage of this behavior. The popping and splashing action created by these flies imitates struggling prey, drawing aggressive strikes from bass.

How to Fish It: Poppers should be fished on the surface, creating a popping sound and splash to attract bass. Cast near structure or vegetation and retrieve with short, sharp strips to create the desired popping action. Vary the speed and intensity of your retrieves to see what triggers the most strikes.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is perfect for fishing poppers. Use a shorter leader, around 7.5 feet, with a 0X or 1X tippet to ensure a strong connection to the fly.

4. Deceiver

History: The Deceiver, created by Lefty Kreh in the 1950s, is a classic baitfish imitation fly. Its realistic profile and swimming action have made it a favorite among anglers targeting predatory fish, including largemouth bass.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are attracted to the Deceiver due to its lifelike appearance and movement. This fly imitates various baitfish species, making it an effective choice for bass fishing.

How to Fish It: The Deceiver can be fished using various techniques. One effective method is to strip it in with long, steady pulls to mimic a swimming baitfish. You can also use shorter, quicker strips to create an erratic action that triggers strikes.

Equipment: A 9-foot 7-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is ideal for fishing the Deceiver. Use a 9-foot tapered leader with a 1X or 2X tippet for the best presentation.

5. Bunny Leech

History: The Bunny Leech is a modern fly pattern that uses rabbit fur to create a lifelike, undulating motion in the water. This fly has become popular among bass anglers for its versatility and effectiveness.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are attracted to the Bunny Leech due to its realistic movement and profile. The rabbit fur creates a natural motion that mimics leeches, baitfish, and other prey, making it an irresistible target for bass.

How to Fish It: The Bunny Leech can be fished using various techniques. You can strip it in with short, jerky motions to mimic a fleeing baitfish or let it drift naturally in the current. Slow, steady retrieves often work best when targeting largemouth bass.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is ideal for fishing the Bunny Leech. Use a 9-foot tapered leader with a 1X or 2X tippet for the best presentation.

6. Mouse Pattern

History: Mouse patterns have been used by anglers for decades to target predatory fish that feed on small mammals. These flies are designed to mimic the appearance and movement of mice swimming on the surface.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are known to feed on small mammals, and mouse patterns take advantage of this behavior. The lifelike profile and movement of these flies create an irresistible target for bass.

How to Fish It: Mouse patterns should be fished on the surface, creating a wake as they move through the water. Cast near structure or vegetation and retrieve with a slow, steady motion to mimic a swimming mouse. Be prepared for explosive strikes as bass attack from below.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is perfect for fishing mouse patterns. Use a shorter leader, around 7.5 feet, with a 0X or 1X tippet to ensure a strong connection to the fly.

7. Foam Grasshopper

History: Foam grasshopper patterns have been popular among anglers for many years. These flies are designed to mimic the appearance and movement of grasshoppers and other large terrestrial insects.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are drawn to foam grasshopper patterns due to their lifelike profile and movement. These flies create a natural splashing and struggling action that attracts aggressive strikes from bass.

How to Fish It: Foam grasshoppers should be fished on the surface, creating a splashing and struggling action. Cast near structure or vegetation and retrieve with short, sharp strips to mimic a struggling grasshopper. Vary the speed and intensity of your retrieves to see what triggers the most strikes.

Equipment: A 9-foot 7-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is ideal for fishing foam grasshoppers. Use a 9-foot tapered leader with a 0X or 1X tippet for the best presentation.

8. Crawfish Pattern

History: Crawfish patterns have been used by anglers for many years to imitate one of the primary food sources for largemouth bass. These flies are designed to mimic the appearance and movement of crawfish.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are highly responsive to crawfish patterns due to their realistic profile and movement. These flies create a natural, scurrying action that attracts aggressive strikes from bass.

How to Fish It: Crawfish patterns should be fished near the bottom, creating a scurrying and darting action. Cast near structure or vegetation and retrieve with short, sharp strips to mimic a fleeing crawfish. Be prepared for aggressive strikes as bass pounce on the fly.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is perfect for fishing crawfish patterns. Use a shorter leader, around 7.5 feet, with a 0X or 1X tippet to ensure a strong connection to the fly.

9. Bass Bug

History: Bass bugs have been a favorite among bass anglers for decades. These large, buoyant flies are designed to mimic frogs, mice, and other surface prey, creating an enticing target for largemouth bass.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are known for their explosive topwater strikes, and bass bugs are designed to take advantage of this behavior. The large profile and splashing action of these flies attract aggressive strikes from bass.

How to Fish It: Bass bugs should be fished on the surface, creating a splashing and struggling action. Cast near structure or vegetation and retrieve with short, sharp strips to create the desired action. Vary the speed and intensity of your retrieves to see what triggers the most strikes.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is perfect for fishing bass bugs. Use a shorter leader, around 7.5 feet, with a 0X or 1X tippet to ensure a strong connection to the fly.

10. Sculpin Pattern

History: Sculpin patterns have been used by anglers for many years to imitate one of the primary food sources for largemouth bass. These flies are designed to mimic the appearance and movement of sculpins.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are highly responsive to sculpin patterns due to their realistic profile and movement. These flies create a natural, darting action that attracts aggressive strikes from bass.

How to Fish It: Sculpin patterns should be fished near the bottom, creating a darting and scurrying action. Cast near structure or vegetation and retrieve with short, sharp strips to mimic a fleeing sculpin. Be prepared for aggressive strikes as bass pounce on the fly.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is perfect for fishing sculpin patterns. Use a shorter leader, around 7.5 feet, with a 0X or 1X tippet to ensure a strong connection to the fly.

11. Frog Pattern

History: Frog patterns have been used by anglers for many years to imitate one of the primary food sources for largemouth bass. These flies are designed to mimic the appearance and movement of frogs.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are highly responsive to frog patterns due to their realistic profile and movement. These flies create a natural, hopping action that attracts aggressive strikes from bass.

How to Fish It: Frog patterns should be fished on the surface, creating a hopping and struggling action. Cast near structure or vegetation and retrieve with short, sharp strips to mimic a fleeing frog. Be prepared for explosive strikes as bass attack from below.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is perfect for fishing frog patterns. Use a shorter leader, around 7.5 feet, with a 0X or 1X tippet to ensure a strong connection to the fly.

12. Zonker

History: The Zonker is a versatile streamer pattern that has been popular among anglers for many years. Its lifelike movement and profile make it an effective choice for targeting largemouth bass.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are attracted to the Zonker due to its realistic appearance and movement. This fly mimics various prey, including baitfish and leeches, making it a go-to pattern for bass anglers.

How to Fish It: The Zonker can be fished using various techniques. You can strip it in with short, jerky motions to mimic a fleeing baitfish or let it drift naturally in the current. Slow, steady retrieves often work best when targeting largemouth bass.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is ideal for fishing the Zonker. Use a 9-foot tapered leader with a 1X or 2X tippet for the best presentation.

13. Dragonfly Nymph

History: Dragonfly nymph patterns have been used by anglers for many years to imitate one of the primary food sources for largemouth bass. These flies are designed to mimic the appearance and movement of dragonfly nymphs.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are highly responsive to dragonfly nymph patterns due to their realistic profile and movement. These flies create a natural, darting action that attracts aggressive strikes from bass.

How to Fish It: Dragonfly nymph patterns should be fished near the bottom, creating a darting and scurrying action. Cast near structure or vegetation and retrieve with short, sharp strips to mimic a fleeing nymph. Be prepared for aggressive strikes as bass pounce on the fly.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is perfect for fishing dragonfly nymph patterns. Use a shorter leader, around 7.5 feet, with a 0X or 1X tippet to ensure a strong connection to the fly.

14. Game Changer

History: The Game Changer, developed by Blane Chocklett, is a modern, articulated streamer pattern designed to mimic baitfish. Its realistic movement and profile have made it a popular choice for targeting largemouth bass.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are attracted to the Game Changer due to its lifelike appearance and movement. This fly mimics various prey, including baitfish and leeches, making it an effective choice for bass anglers.

How to Fish It: The Game Changer can be fished using various techniques. You can strip it in with short, jerky motions to mimic a fleeing baitfish or let it drift naturally in the current. Slow, steady retrieves often work best when targeting largemouth bass.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is ideal for fishing the Game Changer. Use a 9-foot tapered leader with a 1X or 2X tippet for the best presentation.

15. Streamer

History: Streamers have been used by anglers for many years to target predatory fish. These versatile flies are designed to mimic the appearance and movement of baitfish, making them a favorite among bass anglers.

Fish Attraction: Largemouth bass are attracted to streamers due to their realistic profile and movement. These flies create a natural, darting action that attracts aggressive strikes from bass.

How to Fish It: Streamers should be fished near the bottom, creating a darting and scurrying action. Cast near structure or vegetation and retrieve with short, sharp strips to mimic a fleeing baitfish. Be prepared for aggressive strikes as bass pounce on the fly.

Equipment: A 9-foot 8-weight rod with a weight-forward floating line is perfect for fishing streamers. Use a shorter leader, around 7.5 feet, with a 0X or 1X tippet to ensure a strong connection to the fly.

Fly fishing for largemouth bass can be incredibly rewarding, especially when you use the right flies. Each of these patterns has a rich history and has proven to be effective in attracting largemouth bass. By understanding their origins, how to fish them, and the appropriate equipment to use, you can enhance your bass fishing experience. So, pack your fly box with these top largemouth bass fishing flies and enjoy the thrill of targeting one of North America's most popular game fish.

Prev Post
Next Post

Thanks for subscribing!

This email has been registered!

Shop the look

Choose Options

Recently Viewed

Social

Edit Option
Back In Stock Notification
this is just a warning
Shopping Cart
0 items